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“I always wanted to be the man next door who only pleasant things to say” Giannis Dalianidis

Born in Thessaloniki on the 31st December 1923 and raised by his adoptive parents. Giannis Dalianidis was enamored by the cinema from an early age yet began his professional life as a choreographer and dancer. In 1957, he became acquainted with director Dimitris Athanasides who cast him as one of the titular guys in Ta tria paida Voliotika / The Three Guys From Volos and introduced him to contemporaries at Olympia Film. The following year, Dalianidis wrote his first screenplay To Trellokoritso / She’s a Lunatic and directed his debut Moutsitsa / Little Vixen which was released in February 1959 to substantial financial success.

In 1961, Dalianidis began the most effective collaboration in the history of Greek Cinema with Filopimin Finos of Finos Film. While under Finos, he directed a staggering sixty films and wrote the screenplays for fifty of them. With unmatched creative versatility, Dalianidis’ worked in a variety of genres (comedy, musical, melodrama) and frequently topped the box office. When Finos died in 1977, a devastated Daliandis entered a directorial hiatus and returned four years later in 1981 to release his final films with Giorgos Karagiannis & Co. Despite financial successes, by 1989 Dalianidis devoted himself exclusively to the dominant medium of television. He passed away on 16th of October 2010 though lives on as “national hero” in Greece.


This website in its form will function as something between a database and journal, providing a critical voice to the eclectic cinema of Giannis Dalianidis. I intend to argue the case for Dalianidis as an auteur and analyze the function of gender and sexuality in his films. Eventually, it is my wide-reaching goal to produce a study that cross-examines Dalianidis’ musicals with those of French director Jacques Demy, comparing the queer subtexts present in both.


Special thanks to Lydia Papadimitriou and Vrasidas Karalis for their landmark writings on Dalianidis, which ignited my passion. Thank you also to Bill Mousoulis for listening and offering encouragement.

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